Mint Monograph

Peppermint – Mentha piperita – Mercury

Family: Lamiaceae

Description:https://i1.wp.com/plantillustrations.org/ILLUSTRATIONS_HD/13143.jpg?resize=272%2C381

  • square, purple-ish stems – small and dark and leaves
  • flowing sprawling habits
  • mint smell

Habitat: Europe, Asia – Naturalized in North America. Needs full sun to partial shade – alkaline, rich soil with lots of water. Add nitrogen for an increase of volatile oil. Use drip irrigation for healthier growth. It spreads profusely and doesn’t like extremes

Energetics: Cool (at first) Warming (continued); Drying – yang (varies by species) – fire (varies by species)

Actions: carminative; circulatory stimulant; anti-emetic; astringent; anti-inflammatory; antispasmodic; diaphoretic; antimicrobial; nervine; anti-parasitic; antiseptic; antiviral; stomachic; diuretic; topical analgesic; expectorant

Constituents: phenolic acids (caffeic, chlorgenic, rosmarinic); essential oils (up to 1.5%); majority is menthol, menthone, and methyl acetate; flavonoids (glycosides of apigenin, diosmetin and luteolin); tannins

Medicinal Uses: leaf

  • mental lethargy
  • anxiety
  • topical: fungal infections (not ofr kids)
  • common cold, bronchitis, influenza
  • angina
  • cardionuerosis
  • nausea, vomiting, spasmodic flatulence
  • indigestions (not caused by hiatal hernia)
  • IBS/IBD
  • Dysmenorrhea (painful periods)
  • Fever
  • intestinal colic
  • motion and morning sickness
  • asthma (symptoms and relief)
  • dries dampness
  • expels phlegm
  • clears the head
  • add to formulas with laxative herbs to prevent intestinal gripe
  • pathogens, including staph, candida, and strep
  • warm compress: backpain, joint inflammation, lung infection, sinuitis
  • face steam for asthma (and other lung issues), nausea, shock, and sinus congestion
  • EO: tooth powder

Flower Essence

  • overcome lethargy and mental dullness by promoting quick, and clear thinking
  • helps user to see a positive future
  • helpful for those with excess fear of losing their health, money, or loved ones

Edible

  • Spearmint is better for cooking than peppermint because it’s less cooling

Contraindications

  • hiatal hernia
  • bile-duct obstruction
  • gallbladder disease
  • EO in pregnancy – but leaf is okay in small amounts
  • nursing mothers – can dry up breast milk in large amounts.
  • with coldness, chills or yin deficiency

Personal Use

Growing Mint is basically the easiest thing ever – it wants to grow.. actually, it wants to dominate the garden. I use her in foot baths, steam baths, swishes and gargles. He’s a great smoking herb and I like to add a bit of mint and sage to my tobacco. I also like to eat a leaf after I smoke to help get rid of smoker’s breath. The essential oil is wonderful in a room spray, on the toothbrush for a minty mouth, and in vinegar to help clean. For stomach aches that are low in the gut, mint certainly helps move it along.

References:

Alfs, M. (2003). 300 Herbs Their Indications and Contraindications. New Brighton, MN: Old Theology Book House.

Hoffmann, D. (2003). Medical herbalism: The science and practice of herbal medicine. Rochester, Vt.: Healing Arts Press.

Gardner, L. (2008). Life in the medicine: A guide to growing and harvesting herbs for medicine making. Sebastopol, C.A.: Emerald Earth Pub.

Hobbs, C., & Gardner, L. (n.d.). Grow it, heal it: Natural and effective herbal remedies from your garden or windowsill.

Mars

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